Wolfgang Tillmans, Shades, 2001

Wolfgang Tillmans, Shades, 2001

Gustav Klimt, The Park, 1910

Gustav Klimt, The Park, 1910

Alexander Calder, The Hostess, 1928

Alexander Calder, The Hostess, 1928

Joan Miro, Person Throwing a Stone at a Bird, 1926

Joan Miro, Person Throwing a Stone at a Bird, 1926

Henri Mattise, Landscape At Collioure, 1905

Henri Mattise, Landscape At Collioure, 1905

Sagaki Keita, Mona Lisa, 2008

From afar, these pieces by artist Sagaki Keita seem to simply be monochrome replicas of classic masterpieces.  Look very closely, though, and immense detail suddenly appears.  Thousands of little doodles pile up and work together to create one large composition.  For darker areas of a masterpiece such as the Mona Lisa or The Great Wave off Kanagawa, Keita arranges his doodles more densely, packing more lines into smaller spaces.  Beyond impressively combining the large with the tiny, Keita also playfully contrasts playful doodles with some of art history’s most sacred pieces.  In Keita’s meticulous ink drawings casual skillfully meets formal. (x)

Vassily Kandinsky, Untitled (First Abstract Watercolor), 1910

Vassily Kandinsky, Untitled (First Abstract Watercolor), 1910

Glenn Ligon, Graduating Girl(Version 2) #1, 2000

Glenn Ligon, Graduating Girl(Version 2) #1, 2000

Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait of Joseph Roulin, 1889

Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait of Joseph Roulin, 1889

Alex Calder, Red Lily Pads, 1956

Alex Calder, Red Lily Pads, 1956

Willem de Kooning, A Tree in Naples, 1960

Willem de Kooning, A Tree in Naples, 1960

Doug Wheeler, SA MI DW SM 2 75, 1975

Doug Wheeler, SA MI DW SM 2 75, 1975

Max Ernst,  Le baiser (The Kiss), 1927

Max Ernst,  Le baiser (The Kiss), 1927

Henri Mattise, Pleine Mer (High Tide), 1920

Henri Mattise, Pleine Mer (High Tide), 1920

Gabriel Dawes, Plexus, 2013

Gabriel Dawe‘s site specific installations are at once large yet delicate.  Myriads of multicolored threads shoot across open spaces like rays of light.  An intriguing balance between the installation’s ephemeral atmosphere and the concreteness of the thread seems to transform something about the space it inhabits.  At the same time his installations’ resemblance to a loom (albeit, a giant technicolor loom) can not be escaped.  Indeed, in his statement Dawe explains that his installations “explore the connection between fashion and architecture, and how they relate to the human need for shelter in all its shapes and forms.”  With this in mind, each of his Plexus installations, as they are titled, evoke ideas of clothing as well as shelter and inside space. (x)